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Apply for the 2015 Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Program (TAAP)

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Oregon traditional artist Janet Komoto Taiko drumming. Photo credit to Douglas Manger.

The Oregon Folklife Network’s Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Program (TAAP) call for applications is now open for 2015.

This program honors excellent master traditional artists and culture keepers and invites them to apply with apprentices from their own communities, Tribes, cultural, religious, or occupational group for a $3,000 stipend. The stipend pays masters to pass on their knowledge, skills, and expertise to an apprentice of great promise. Click here for the application or here for previous TAAP awardee profiles. Read on for more information about this year’s application.

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It’s a Hard Duck Life

by Jules Helweg-Larsen

Photo from the University of Oregon Libraries shows the Quack Ops logo seen in town. No longer operating, Quack Ops was a student-run business for  "underground apparel for ducks, by ducks," where fans took their representation into their own hands.

Photo from the University of Oregon Libraries shows the Quack Ops logo seen in town. No longer operating, Quack Ops was a student-run business for “underground apparel for ducks, by ducks,” where fans took their representation into their own hands.

Living in Eugene, it is impossible to escape Duck Pride as Oregon football fandom. Church sermons invoke the Ducks and refer to the team’s hard work and dedication. Grocery store transactions and chats at local cafes or gas stations conclude with “Go Ducks!” Fans wear school colors and jerseys, as well as shirts stating “QUACK ATTACK” and “Come to the Duck Side”.

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Tribute to Mark Lewis, Storyteller

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Photo courtesy of Debra M. Josephson.

by Adrienne Decker

Tall tales, jokes, and mythical stories are some of our oldest and most beloved forms of folklore. OFN recognizes the legacy of one of Oregon’s greatest storytellers, Mark Lewis, who passed away unexpectedly on December 7th. Lewis inspired confidence and a deep appreciation for the power of the imagination, promising to always be the supportive “angel in the audience” for the hundreds of students and budding performers he mentored throughout his career. An actor and professional storyteller, Lewis won two Emmy awards for a televised performance of his signature piece “Word Pictures.” He also taught highly popular classes at the UO School of Journalism and had long worked with a variety of educational and recreational programs for youth throughout the state.
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