National Resources

 

  • American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress offers many digital collections containing myths, legends, fairy-tales, superstitions, weather-lore, and ghost stories.
  • American Folktales provides lesson plans, videos, books, activities, and background information about folktales.
  • American Slave Narratives.  This web site provides an opportunity to read a sample of these narratives, and to see some of the photographs taken at the time of the interviews.
  • ArtsEdge supports the placement of the arts at the center of the curriculum and advocates creative use of technology to enhance K-12 education.
  • The Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University teaches, engages in, and presents documentary work grounded in collaborative partnerships and extended fieldwork that uses photography, film/video, audio, and narrative writing to capture and convey contemporary memory, life, and culture.
  • ChinaVine interprets China’s cultural heritage for English reading/speaking audiences through multimedia. Contributors from China and the U.S. include University of Oregon scholars and students.
  • EDSITEment offers a treasure trove for teachers, students, and parents searching for high-quality material on the Internet in the subject areas of literature and language arts, foreign languages, art and culture, and history and social studies.
  • Educational CyberPlayground provides the public, teachers, administrators, policy makers, parents, librarians, and home schoolers a “webliography” of links to educational resources in a wide range of subjects.
  • Exploring Everyday Folklore is an interactive workshop with author Nina Jaffe.  Jaffe provides an introduction to different kinds of folklore and shares tips for researching, recording, and creating folklore from everyday experiences.
  • Folkstreams is a video-streaming national preserve of folk culture documentaries and offers users extensive background materials for each, including films by Sharon Sherman of the University of Oregon. See the Educators Portal for student worksheets and lesson plans for middle and high school and higher education.
  • Folkvine gives users multimedia options to explore folk artists’ environments and aesthetics, including bobble head dolls representing real-life scholars, thematic guides, and even a board game for younger students.
  • H-Net’s Oral History Projects creates and coordinates Internet networks with the common objective of advancing teaching and research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences.
  • The Labor Heritage Foundation’s mission is to preserve and promote knowledge of the cultural heritage of the American worker through the arts, including music, poetry, written works, theatre, and artistic work.
  • The Library of Congress provides ready-to-use materials that bring the Library’s primary sources into the classroom.
  • Local Learning advocates inclusion of folk arts and artists in the nation’s education and provides virtual residencies with NEA National Heritage Fellows, a library of articles for teachers, regional resources, and tools for engaging young people in fieldwork and folklore.  See the virtual artist residency with Eva Castellanoz of Nyssa, Oregon.
  • National Council for the Traditional Arts is a private, not-for-profit corporation dedicated to the presentation and documentation of folk and traditional arts in the United States.  Founded in 1933, it is the oldest folk arts organization in the nation.
  • National Museum of the American Indian is the first national museum dedicated to the preservation, study, and exhibition of the life, languages, literature, history, and arts of Native Americans.
  • The Oral History Association seeks to bring together all persons interested in oral history as a way of collecting and interpreting human memories to foster knowledge and human dignity.
  • Promise of Place immerses students in local heritage, cultures, landscapes, opportunities and experiences.
  • USC Shoah Foundation Institute presents video testimonies from survivors and other witnesses of the Holocaust.  The institute’s mission is to overcome prejudice, intolerance, and bigotry—and the suffering they cause—through the educational use of the Institute’s visual history testimonies